Hans Hoyer G10 Review

4.6 Overall
4.7 Users (3 votes)
Pros
- Good projection/sound quality
- Better intonation vs. some Geyer models in high range
Cons
- May not fit in some smaller cases
- Factory made
- Hard to find used
Summary
The Hoyer G10 is German made, Geyer-style horn targeted to serious players seeking the next step up from popular factory horns like Conn and Yamaha. Priced new in the $6000 range, it's cheaper than most premium custom horns without making great sacrifices in quality. The G10 is one of the more expensive factory made horns you can buy, but it is a cut above others manufactured this way. While many flavors of Geyer horns exist, the Hoyer G10 is designed to closely model the original Carl Geyer design. This legendary design is known for its well slotted notes and strong sound projection. As with all Geyer horns, certain notes can require some fine tuning to pitch correctly but the G10 is better than most in this regard -- with a great high F to Bb range. You'll want to play with the slide positions to ensure matching between F and Bb sides. It has a lovely tone quality as you can hear in this demo video. The horn is neither overly bright or dark sounding, making it an ideal horn to blend with any section. The low range is also quite good. Despite being a medium bell horn, it has a fairly large circumference, so be careful about what case you buy as sometimes it won't fit. For players switching from a different horn, you may find the trigger position takes a little time to get used to, but it is adjustable. The horn also includes an adjustable pinky finger hook. You won't find many G10s for sale used because buyers tend to keep them. Hoyer also makes a Kruspe-style horn called the 6801.

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Tone quality
Playability
Construction
Value for money
What people say... 3 Leave your rating
Great for USA not the best choice for pro on europe
I played the g10 from 2014 to 2020. Its a beatifully manufactured horn with all the notes on the right place.

its easy to play if you have a lot of air to use, but if your breathing is shallow and not so powerfull this horn will not sing for you. It is not a forgiving horn like Alexander or dieter otto but if you fokus your air just right this horn has so many colours more. The wrap is really big and that really helps if you play On the leg. If you hold your horn completely on your hands i recommend a smaller more compact horn or a lot of exercice for your hands and upper Back.

So if you are planning to be a pro on the USA this is a really good choice. If you are planning to be a pro on Europe i recommend that you spend couple thousand more and buy and Alexander or paxman.
For a non-professionall player this horn is an great choice anywhere on the world.

Best of luck!
Best of luck !

Have a good one!


I upgrated mine with atkinssons nickelsilver bell for concert band use. And it really works: better sound and better respons.
July 20, 2020, 1:11 pm
Tone quality5
Playability4
Construction3.5
Value for money5
0
0
An absolute joy to play
I upgraded from a lifetime held student horn 6 months ago to the G10. I wasn't going to spend quite that much but I fell in love with the instrument trying it in the shop. In comparison to the G10 the Yamahas and cheaper HH horns I tried felt stuffy and unresponsive. As others have said the G10 slots reliably, particularly at the high end, lip trills suddenly became much more controlled, and I can reliably play legato up to to A on the F horn. The projection is awesome, and without a lot of physical effort the sound will project above a band to the back of the hall. There is a good range of tone colours and the staccato attack is particularly sharp. I have the full mechanical linkages - no more fiddling with string, and there is little valve noise. As I said my impression was of a particularly lively and responsive instrument. There has to be some downsides - the big one for me is that the bell pipe and bell are very thin soft metal - and the slightest knock will put a dent in it. And the trigger valve takes a lot of adjusting before it feels comfortable.
September 24, 2019, 4:31 am
Tone quality5
Playability5
Construction4.5
Value for money4.5
0
5
Wonderful Instrument!!
This is a fantastic piece of craftsmanship! Despite the fact that this is factory made, it plays comparably to hand made horns I have tried ( Rauch, Geyer. It’s also a fraction of the cost.)

The horn’s intonation is superb and tone color is gorgeous. Because of the ease of playing and little resistance, the horn sings through all ranges. The horn also has a huge range of tone color, dynamics and articulation. The attacks are extremely responsive and dynamic. Each note’s pitch is centered into place. This is especially useful in the high ranges where each notes “clicks” into place. The F and Bb side are uniform and are in tune to one another.

General build quality is excellent. Both the thumb valve and the pinky ring are adjust to fit anyone with a small hand or large hand. The horn is balanced extremely well and is lighter than I am used to. There is a long pull ring on the 2nd valve slide (Bb side) for easy removal and the 3rd valve slides are easy to remove as well.

The case is a bit bulky. However, the case is lightweight and nice to carry because of the backpack straps. There are also 2 accessory slots in the case, an exterior pouch for whatever and a slot that fits a large black music folder. I have heard that this case should fit overhead in a plane, but I have not had experience with this yet.

Overall, this horn works wonderfully for chamber music, symphony orchestras, and solos. I know this horn will be reliable and will produce the tone I want it to. This is a wonderful instrument that is worth more than its price. I highly recommend it. Happy horn playing!
May 21, 2019, 3:08 am
Tone quality5
Playability5
Construction4.5
Value for money5
0
22
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Yamaha Xeno 882O & 882OR Review

4.4 Overall
4.6 Users (1 vote)
Pros
- Flexible
- Notes slot in well
- Well made
Cons
- Sound is less distinctive
Summary
Yamaha instruments are known for exacting engineering and built with an eye toward making optimizations on competitors' models. The Xeno models are top-end horns designed in close collaboration with professionals in the field.

The YHR-882O tenor trombone, designed with Peter Sullivan of the Pittsburgh Symphony, includes a few number of features that differentiate it from competitors like the Conn 88H and Bach 42B. At 8 and 2/3 inches, the 882O bell is slightly larger than the typical 8 1/2 in this competitive set, which adds some openness to the sound. Yamaha's design optimizations have resulted in a very playable horn with notes that slot in nicely. Traditionally, players have complained Yamaha trombones (the 600 series) don't sufficiently distinguish themselves tonally, caught in the center spectrum between the Conn 88H's richness and the Bach 42's clear boldness. But the Xeno 882O, thanks in part to the larger bell, has a traditional bright tone that opens up nicely. To add some more color to the tone, consider the 882GO model that features a gold brass bell vs. the standard yellow brass. Keep in mind that you'll sacrifice some projection with this model compared to the yellow brass. The 8820 features a more traditional narrow slide that adds to the horn's flexibility. While perhaps not as distinctive as some competitors, the 882O is extremely well made and plays reliably -- something that can't be said of some major horn manufacturers today.

Yamaha's updated 882OR appears outwardly similar to the 882O, but is designed in collaboration with a different artist, Larry Zalkind, of the Utah Symphony. Typical of Yamaha, the devil is in the details - but these make a big difference to the sound (see a comparison image here). Unlike the 882O, the 8802R features a wider slide --meaning a little less flexibility-- which helps the horn produce a more contemporary, dark sound. Additionally, some adjustments the F and Bb slide positions have been reversed (hence the R in the model number) to allow the bell to vibrate more freely, according to Yamaha.


Which horn is right for you? If you like the traditional compact sound of the Conn 88H, you'll likely be happiest with the 882O. While if you prefer a more modern dark sound with a little less flexibility similar to the Bach 42B, the 8820R is the Yamaha model for you.

Tone quality
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What people say... 1 Leave your rating
Great sounding horn
I have the 8820R and it is the best trombone in my band. Very consistent quality of sound and the range great. Would strongly recommend this over the Bach 42B.
November 13, 2018, 3:15 pm
Tone quality4.5
Playability5
Construction5
Value for money4
1
1
Leave your rating

Bach 42B Review

4.1 Overall
4.5 Users (1 vote)
Pros
- Strong projection
- Good sound quality
Cons
- Less ideal for solo work
Summary
Made from a single piece of yellow brass, the Bach 42 Bb/F trigger trombone is known for its ability to keep a consistent tone quality at the highest volumes of playing - even more so than top competitors such as the Conn 88H. This can be especially important in symphonic environments where the trombones must project over a large orchestra. The 42B is especially popular in American orchestras, where a big but controlled sound is the norm. Due to its yellow brass construction and light hand slide, the 42B is a touch brighter sounding and to some ears in the upper range - a matter of taste depending on your playing style. With its superior loud dynamics, the 42B may not feel quite as flexible on softer tones. The horn can handle a lot of air! As a result, players may feel more comfortable using this horn in an orchestra compared to solo work. Bach has also introduced a 42BO version of the horn, with an open wrap F attachment that helps to open the lower register (though watch out for dents as it extends the horn further behind your head).


Tone quality
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Value for money
What people say... 1 Leave your rating
Great horn
I have a lt42bo- nickel lightweight slide and gold brass bell. Overall very good. Easy to play and great tone. Tge valve is not very good though and the linkage is noisy.
June 19, 2019, 5:36 pm
Tone quality4.5
Playability4.5
Construction4.5
Value for money4.5
0
1
Leave your rating

Conn 88H Review

4.3 Overall
4 Users (6 votes)
Pros
- Good tone quality
- Strong for both symphonic and solo work
Cons
- Newer models are not manufactured to same standards
Summary
This enduringly popular Conn tenor trombone, first produced in 1954, is an evolution on the original 8H, adding a trigger to an F branch and a rose brass bell that darkens the tone. Is 60+ year production run is a testament to its ability to adapt to different symphonic sound concepts - from powering the core of an orchestra to virtuosic solo performances. But competitors such as the Bach 42B have given the 88H a run for its money, especially in America, where orchestras are demanding an even bigger sound than the Conn. Players seeking more balance in both loud and soft playing though may prefer the 88H, however. What about the 88H's design gives it this versatility? According to The Horn Guys, a narrower hand slide vs. competitors such as the Bach 42B helps to give the tone a more stable anchor, especially given its large bell/bore, while the mix of bronze metal adds just the right color to bring out solos beautifully. In the 1990s, Conn added additional options (GEN2) to allow the 88H to adapt to modern playing, such as the open wrap 88HO (open F side gives the horn less resistance especially in lower register - though also more tubing behind the head), the thin-belled Conn 88HT (adds some additional resonance), and the Conn 88HY (yellow brass bell to brighten the sound). While these new iterations are popular, the original may still be the best mix of sound, playability and ergodynamics for most players. Unfortunately, Conn's manufacturing standards have slipped in recent years and the newer models, made in Elkhart since 2015, are not as consistent. For this reason, we recommend finding a good used model.


Tone quality
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What people say... 6 Leave your rating
Enjoy Playing This
I purchased one of the 80s era 88H trombones a few years back and have played it in a variety on ensembles including highschool jazz band, symphonic wond ensembles, put orchestras, etc. My favorite part about the instrument is the impecible tone quality I can produce. A trombone plauer with good air and embochure habits can really make beautiful sounds with this. My only issues have been the trigger spring mechanosm has degraded and have had that repaired; it works like new now! I absolutely reccomend this instrument. Esppecially if you can find one second-hand, a lot of people have no ide awhat theya re selling and you can find great deals.
January 1, 2019, 7:07 pm
Tone quality5
Playability5
Construction4
Value for money5
0
2
Enjoy Playing This
I purchased one of the 80s era 88H trombones a few years back and have played it in a variety on ensembles including highschool jazz band, symphonic wond ensembles, put orchestras, etc. My favorite part about the instrument is the impecible tone quality I can produce. A trombone plauer with good air and embochure habits can really make beautiful sounds with this. My only issues have been the trigger spring mechanosm has degraded and have had that repaired; it works like new now! I absolutely reccomend this instrument. Esppecially if you can find one second-hand, a lot of people have no ide awhat theya re selling and you can find great deals.
January 1, 2019, 7:07 pm
Tone quality5
Playability5
Construction4
Value for money5
0
0
Great, Except for one thing....
I love the tone this thing produces. In all registers, it can pull its weight. I find that it blends extremely well in an ensemble setting, almost to a fault. I think that for its price it is one of the best trombones someone can get on the market. However, I feel that one thing really holds it back. I find that the trigger adds SO much resistance, to a point where it is significantly harder to produce any good tone below an F2. Once you get into pedals its fine, and I find myself hitting Bb1 consistently now, but the F2-C2 partial with the trigger in use just feels so inconsistent and difficult. Upper register is secure, partials slot well. Slide has lasted really well, too. Overall, I'd recommend this horn to anyone, without a doubt, but first I'd make sure they get a chance to try it out first. For the playing I do, the trigger isn't much of a drawback, but for someone else it may be a huge problem. From what I remember, my issues with the trigger are fixed with the CL rotor system on the 88HCL, so that may be worth looking into, as opposed to the 88HO.
December 10, 2018, 4:13 am
Tone quality4.5
Playability4
Construction4
Value for money5
0
0
88H Owner for 52 years.
I have played in jazz ensembles, orchestras, solo work, and studied with the great Lewis van Haney in the 1970s at Indiana University. I have auditioned Bach, Holton, Yamaha, and liked things about each. Overall, NOTHING beats the combination of tone, quality, versatility, and value for my 1964 Elkhart 88H. It was purchased after my senior year in high school, and has been with me to the Orient, Florida, Chicago Area, and Northern Indiana. Occasionally I will substitute
a King Bass for Orchestra Bass Parts, and a smaller bore Conn 14H for Jazz lead,
but for 95+ percent of my playing I rely on my Elkhart 88H, manufactured in 1964.
December 22, 2017, 6:12 am
Tone quality0
Playability0
Construction0
Value for money0
0
1
College student
I bought this horn my senior year of highschool and still love it. I play in both wind ensemble and Jazz Orchestsa with this same horn and he versatility is astonishing. Plus I got it for 1,000.(used) best purchase not looking to really get a new horn.
February 16, 2017, 4:59 pm
Tone quality5
Playability5
Construction4
Value for money5
0
0
Just great
Upgraded to the 88H last year (my freshman year of college) and couldn't be happier. It's got a powerful sound that can cut through with minimal effort with a really sweet core. Recommended to anyone looking to advance their playing.
August 21, 2016, 3:17 pm
Tone quality5
Playability5
Construction5
Value for money5
0
0
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Holton Merker Matic Review

4.4 Overall
3.6 Users (1 vote)
Pros
- Nice consistency through range
- Compact design
- Strong high register
Cons
- Values can get sluggish
Summary
On first glance, Holton's Merker Matic series horns are hard to distinguish from the popular Holton Farkas line - but for the characteristic dome-shaped rotor caps. But pick the horn up, and you'll notice it's a bit smaller. Ethal Merker, former associate principal in the Chicago Symphony, designed this series to appear especially to smaller-framed players who want the richness of the Conn 8D without its size and heft. The dome-shaped values are not all show; they add extra weight to the value cluster, helping to add more richness to the sound. The Merker Matic series are dual bore horns, meaning the F and Bb sides of the instrument are different sizes: .468 on the F side and .460 on the Bb side. This helps facilitate easier playing in the high register without sacrificing richness in the mid range. Some players complain that earlier models have sluggish value action, so consider oiling this horn more often than others.

The Merker Series, now discontinued, come in several different models: the H175 (nickel silver), H176 (rose bronze bell), H189 (larger bell nickel silver), H183 (brass), H292 (Geyer-style). The H175 and H176 are the most popular variations.

To hear the Merker Matic in action, check out the following video: Gliere Horn Concerto, Steve Park.


Tone quality
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Construction
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What people say... 1 Leave your rating
Holton 292 Double Horn
The horn "centers" on pitches very well, tone quality is good and response is consistent through the entire range. It is a bit heavy and can be a little tiring to hold.
But - the trigger valve assembly is a disaster. The trigger simply could not be used in fast passages. The horn was basically unusable until I had a new trigger linkage designed and built. Possibly the best $200 I ever spent on a horn.
April 7, 2019, 1:03 am
Tone quality4
Playability4.5
Construction2
Value for money4
0
1
Leave your rating

Schmid French Horn Review

4.4 Overall
4.6 Users (1 vote)
Pros

-Light
-Easy to play
-Popular with pros

Cons

-Expensive
-Spots can appear on bell

Summary

Engelbert Schmid horns have sky-rocketed in popularity over the last decade, with converts ranging from Phil Myers of the NY Philharmonic to Pip Eastop of the London Chamber Orchestra. What's all the fuss about? This German horn maker is quickly gaining a reputation for innovative manufacturing practices that are resulting in more efficient, lighter weight horns. This is especially beneficial for Schmid's popular triple horns. "Mathematics and physics were my favorite subjects in high school," says Mr. Schmid, who uses digital models to construct horns to exacting standards of measurement.


Schmid double horns are designed using Geyer/Knopf foundation, typically resulting in great smoothness of slurs at the expensive of some intonation issues on certain notes. Schmid has taken extensive efforts to solve the intonation inconsistencies, one reason why pros are gravitating toward these horns.


Another typical characteristic of Geyer/Knopf style horns is a brighter sound. Popular in many American orchestras, the brighter tone is less appreciated in Germany, where Schmid horns are made. Schmid horns have a sufficiently dark tone to win over 8D holdouts and tempt some loyal Alexander players, but have their own sound that is unique. "I wanted to tone down the often aggressive core of German horn playing and to produce a more noble sound," says Schmid. Schmid offers a number of customization options with bell and metal combinations, allowing players to make the ideal sound for them.


Schmid horns have one notable defect that may be especially apparent on used models: the lacquer around the bell may start to deteriorate resulting in small spots. If you prick them with a pin when you first notice them, it can help to reduce the spreading. While these spots don't affect tone quality, it is not expected for a horn in this price range. But spots or not, the Schmid horns are in high demand by top players and as a result hold their value very well.



Also consider: Especially within Germany, the Schmid's main competition is the popular Alexander 103 which has a stronghold on the market.

Tone quality
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Construction
Value for money
What people say... 1 Leave your rating
Schmid horn
An excellent horn, very playable and very close to a natural horn feelling. Just TOO expensive.
December 29, 2018, 4:24 pm
Tone quality5
Playability5
Construction5
Value for money3.5
0
3
Leave your rating

Jupiter 1150 Review

4 Overall
0 Users (0 votes)
Pros

- Good value
- Newer model

Cons

- Not widely played
- Considered a student horn

Summary

Jupiter French horn line might be called the red-headed stepchild of the horn world, lacking the popularity and reputation of competitors such as Holton and Conn. Jupiter's sole focus is the mid-low price range market and as a result their horns are not taken seriously and are virtually unheard of in the professional world.


But while other more popular brands have been resting on their reputations without much innovation, Jupiter has recently invested in a new model that's starting to gain some attention: the 1150. A Geyer-style wrap, the 1150 shares many of the design qualities of more expensive horns but at a significant price discount.


The horn has a compact, warm sound that is clear and consistent through the ranges, especially the upper register where the horn really rings. To hear the Jupiter 1150 screaming some high notes, check out this video.The Geyer design makes slurs on this horn especially nice. And at loud volumes, the horn does not lose clarity giving it good projection in a concert hall. More mature players may consider this horn to be limiting in tonal flexibility, however it is a solid recommendation for beginning and intermediate students who want a new horn at a more reasonable price. The detachable bell version is especially attractive compared to competitor prices.


Cost: The Jupiter 1150 currently sells for $3,300 new.



Also consider: The most direct competitor is Yamaha's model 567. Another horn in this price range worth considering is the Holton H379.


Tone quality
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Construction
Value for money
What people say... 0 Leave your rating

Be the first to leave a rating.

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Holton H181 Review

3.9 Overall
4.4 Users (2 votes)
Pros

- Big sound with nuance
- Unique rose brass construction

Cons

- Sound can be dark for some taste

Summary

The Holton H181 (and its detachable bell counterpart, the H281) is a Farkas style Kruspe wrap horn, whose differentiating feature is a rose brass bell that helps the horn project and resonate with a richer sound compared to the nickle silver H179. The rose brass bell also adds some additional tonal nuance especially at louder volumes.


Because the H181/H281 have a larger bell which already results in a richer sound, some may advocate the "darkening" quality of rose brass exaggerates the already dark tone of the larger bore Farkas design. But for players seeking this sound, the H181 is a good option because it provides some more nuance and flexibility compared to other traditionally dark-sounding horns such as the Conn 8D in rose brass.


Overall, the H181/H281 is a great horn for an intermediate or mature player who is comfortable projecting a strong sound but wants some flexibility to play at a range of dynamics.


Cost: The Holton H181 sells for $4,350 new.


Also consider: The Holton H180 and H179 are similarly designed models with different levels of responsiveness varying tonal colors. See our Holton French horn guide for more models.


Tone quality
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What people say... 2 Leave your rating
Not for people with small hands
I just started renting one of these from my local music store and I loved it, except the thumb trigger is very high up. I have small hands so I exchanged it for another horn with a low thumb trigger. Besides the thumb trigger, everything was perfect.
August 25, 2018, 2:18 pm
Tone quality5
Playability4
Construction4
Value for money4.5
0
3
Holton 181
Before i purchased the 181, I had the chance to try out the paxman series 4. I ended up with the h181. In my opinion, the paxman 4 is a great instrument, however i feel that the sound is rather thin and more to the bright side. It doesnt feel free blowing as the 181 did.
The 181 sound is dark and somewhat mellow but please be careful with the bell. Its rather thin, seriously thin.
I paired the horn with a breslmair wien mouthpiece and as a result the sound is more focused, tone clearer, pitch inproved and less resistance while playing.

I wouldn't recomment the 181 if you're a high horn player. I reckon the 179 would be better for high players.
April 24, 2017, 11:10 pm
Tone quality4.5
Playability4.5
Construction4
Value for money4
0
1
Leave your rating

Conn 11D & 11DE Review

3.8 Overall
4.4 Users (2 votes)
Pros

- Open sound with ease of control
-Strong low register
- Lower cost alternative to custom Geyer style horns

Cons

- Inconsistent manufacturing quality

- High Bb is hard to produce

Summary

The 11D is a medium sized Geyer style horn that provides a bit more openness of tone compared to its small-bell cousin the Conn 10D. Both of these "open wrap" Geyer horns by Conn contrast with the more widely known and larger "closed wrap" Conn 8D, emphasizing tonal focus and ease of control over the large sound produced by the 8D. Within the price range and style, the Conn 11D and 10D's key competitors are the Yamaha 667 and the slightly more expensive Hoyer G10. So how does it stack up? Conn's Geyer style horns--a design that's increasingly popular across all manufacturers-- have not gained the same popularity as the Yamaha 667 Geyer horns, in part because the Conn 8D overshadows them as Conn's legacy brand.


But they have developed some traction. Canadian Brass hornist Bernhard Scully plays on a gold plated 11D because Conn is now the official instrument sponsor of the Canadian Brass (just as Yamaha before them), we'll may see younger players gravitating towards these horns. If they're good enough for the Canadian Brass are they good enough for any professional? While the horn design is solid and quite similar to much more expensive horns, players say the build quality is hit or miss. Some have reported some sloppy manufacturing practices, as highlighted in this video from Houghton Horns.


Typical of Geyer-style horns, some notes in the high register are squirrely - a sacrifice many are willing to pay for other benefits. On this horn, the Bb above the staff can be difficult to produce with the standard trigger + 1 fingering. But lower horn players should be pleased with the 11D's comparatively open and clear sound below the staff, which is better than many higher priced Geyer-style horns. Learn more about Conn horns.


If transitioning from a Kruspe-style horn, we recommend trying the rose brass bell version which offers a more similar dark sound than the yellow brass.


UPDATE: As of 2015, the 11D has been replaced by the 11DE. Improvements include a redesigned F branch, offering a more open sound. Other cosmetic improvements a new adjustable pinky hook (a big plus for players with smaller or larger than average hands) and two spit values. Once we have a chance to play this redesigned horn and get player feedback, we'll update this review.


Cost: Before discontinuation, the 11DE sold for $4,459 new.



Also consider: A similar horn with fewer manufacturing complaints, the Yamaha 667 is a very popular Geyer style horn.

Tone quality
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What people say... 2 Leave your rating
Conn 8D to 11DRS
Definitely easier to blow than 8D. Love the sound and playability. It would be nice to have a spit valve which DE provides. With a new leadpipe I think this horn will be as good as more expensive models out there.
April 14, 2017, 3:32 am
Tone quality4.5
Playability4.5
Construction4
Value for money5
0
2
good geyer
I tested out a couple horns, 10d, 667 and liked the 11d best, but that could have been my own luck. Blends well in my section which has diverse horns. Have not encountered any manufacturing issues yet but only been playing it a year.
June 13, 2015, 5:16 pm
Tone quality4
Playability5
Construction4.5
Value for money3
0
3
Leave your rating

 

Hans Hoyer 6801 & 6802 Review

4.8 Overall
4.9 Users (5 votes)
Pros

- Centered tone with variety of colors
- Plays much like an original Kruspe
- Thumb key movable for different hand sizes

Cons

- Comparatively heavy

Summary

The Hans Hoyer 6801 and 6802 Heritage horns are copies of the original Kruspe horns, like the more widely known Conn 8D. Kruspe horns have achieved legendary status in the horn world for their beautiful tone quality. But since production discontinued, there are very few working Kruspe horns in existence today. Conn 8Ds made pre-1969 now carry on the Kruspe horn legacy, but even these Conn horns are getting too old to play and maintain. And whether it is perceived or reality, the consensus is newer Conn 8Ds don't have the same magical tone quality.


The Hoyer 6800 series horns endeavor to emulate the now legendary Kruspe sound but with the added benefit of more modern manufacturing and consistency. The owner of Hans Hoyer, Gerhard Meinl, set out to make this Kruspe copy by working closely with regarded professionals including Myron Bloom and Vince DeRosa who play in the Krupse horn style. The result is a very well made horn that to many is a truer copy of the original Kruspe than even the best Conn 8Ds. This especially comes out in the upper register, which sings more on the Hoyer 6800 horns and is easier to play in. The lower register is also strong, especially on the F side of the horn. The Bb side can be a little stuffier down there.


As a German made horn, the 6800 series horns sent to America are given a longer tuning slide to account for the lower pitch that US-based orchestras tune to. If you are an American horn player purchasing from Europe or vice versa, we suggest you make sure the tuning is in line with what you expect before buying. Buying a Hoyer 6801 used can be a challenge due to both the dearth of horns in circulation and high demand, but this also means the horn will hold its value well if you do choose to buy new.


An added benefit of the 6800s is the adjustable thumb trigger. Many players with smaller hands complain the 8D's thumb trigger is placed in an awkward position. On the Hoyer you can adjust to better fit your hand size.


The difference between the 6801 and 6802 is that the former has mechanical valve linkages while the latter has string. While some horn manufacturers have rather noisy mechanical linkages, the Hoyer horns are very quiet. Hans Hoyer also manufactures a 7801 and 7802 version of this model, the only difference being more specially made value caps and bell. We recommend the sticking with the 6800 series unless money is no object to you.


To hear the 6802 being played, see this video from Hans Hoyer featuring a Hollywood solo artist featured in a recent Star Trek movie.


Cost: The 6801 sells for $5,379 new.



Also consider: The Yamaha 668II is a similar Kruspe-style horn that is slightly less expensive than the Hoyer.


Tone quality
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Construction
Value for money
What people say... 5 Leave your rating
68X Series its amazing
looks like perfect horn for me. I have tried and played a few similar models (Paxman/Yamaha/Conn), however, the tone quality for the HH exceeded my expectations
March 5, 2018, 10:57 pm
Tone quality5
Playability5
Construction5
Value for money4.5
2
6
My Hoyer Horn
I have been playing on my 7802 for just over nine years. The only issues I have ever had with my horn are ones I have caused by dropping it, or mishandling it. It has been a very sturdy and reliable horn. The Bb side can tend to lean sharp, but is easily bent back down with some effort and a good mouthpiece. Great in all registers, and capable of many different tones and colors of sound.
January 29, 2017, 5:37 am
Tone quality5
Playability4.5
Construction5
Value for money5
0
7
6801 Heritage
I have been playing this horn for almost 4 years now and I love every aspect of it. It is balanced, has excellent tone, and high and low ranges speak clearly. An excellent horn.
July 11, 2016, 2:45 am
Tone quality5
Playability5
Construction5
Value for money5
0
11
Simply Gorgeous
The tone that a half decent player can extract from this glorious instrument is the reason why we all love the French Horn. The operator said in B flat is effortless and it's only the pedal notes that you really need to play in F. All in all, this one is a winner.
April 18, 2016, 2:30 pm
Tone quality5
Playability5
Construction5
Value for money5
6
9
Best horn i have ever played
Its amazing to play with this horn.
The greatest advantage is the awsome and beautiful sound.
Love it.
December 28, 2015, 7:39 pm
Tone quality5
Playability5
Construction4.5
Value for money5
1
11
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